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Today I want to talk to you about business and brand. I’ve been thinking a lot lately about how your brand is your business, and your business is your brand. And if you know me, you know that that’s something I say over and over again

 

But it’s kind of hard to understand that, right? 

 

As founders, and CEOs, and executives in companies, we grow up understanding the business. The nuts and bolts, the finance, the operations, the customer service, and all the things that make the business run. 

 

But what we don’t always think about is how we’re building that connection with the customer — and that is brand. 

 

How we’re building community — and that is brand. 

 

How we differentiate to really stand out and be unrivaled in our market — and that is brand. 

 

A great example of a business that has made the transition from business to brand is Peloton. Think about it — do you think about Peloton as a business? Chances are, you don’t. You think about Peloton as a brand. 

 

Why is that? It didn’t happen by accident — They have built a brand. They did not come out and say, “We’re a business, we have a more efficient way for you to buy an exercise bike, we have the greatest operations and the greatest customer service.” Instead, they said, “We are going to build a community. We are going to really understand our customers so well that we’re going to build the most engaging way to ride an exercise bike.” 

 

I mean, think about it at its core — the business model isn’t anything really special. It’s a piece of gym equipment that Peleton figured out how to differentiate through brand

 

So, I want you to start to think about how you make this transition from business to brand with your own company. It becomes especially important as your organic growth begins to plateau — because it will. This mindset is powerful, profitable, and valuable. 

 

Giddy up!

 

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